M an' M RabbitryM an' M Rabbitry Raising Jeresey Woolies, Standard Chinchillas, and New Zealand Whites



New Zealand Breed Information

Jeresey Wooly Rabbits
"The Breed in the Lead"

General Characteristics:

The New Zealand is a large sized rabbit weighing in at about 9-11 lbs. for senior bucks and 10-12 lbs. for senior does. The New Zealand is to have a commercial body type that creates the impression of balance and uniformity.The breed is to exemplify meat producing qualities including: well rounded hips, well filled loin, and ribs that carry forward to combine with the shoulders to balance with the rest of the body. The body of the New Zealand is to be of medium length, with good depth and with shoulders blending smoothly into the midsection, and midsection blending smoothly into the hindquarters. When a New Zealand is viewed from the side, the topline should start immediately at the base of the ears and rise in a continuous curve to the high point over the center of the hips and then fall downward in a smooth curve to the base of the tail. When the New Zealand is viewed from above the sides of the rabbit should tape slightly from hindquarters toward the shoulders creating the ideal meat production animal. Overall the New Zealand rabbit should represent the ideal meat qualities necessary for commercial rabbit production.

New Zealand Background:

The New Zealand came into existence through a convoluted background of breedings and crosses throughout the county. The first variety to be established was the New Zealand Red. It is commonly believed that the red coloration was the result of a cross between a Belgian Hare and a White rabbit. This particular cross was performed in numerous places across the county, as the New Zealand Red appeared in both California and Indiana simultaneously. The New Zealand Red became known across the country in 1912, and has continued to be one of the more popular breeds since. The White variety was a result of crossing numerous breeds to achieve the desired New Zealand characteristics. These breeds included the: Flemish Giant, American Whites, Angoras and perhaps a Red or two. Several strains began to emerge from different crosses across the county. Joe Wojcik, of Elyria, Ohio, developed the most notable line of whites for the time period. The New Zealand White variety was accepted by the American Rabbit Breeders Association in the mid 1920's. The Black variety was developed much later using many crosses including the Giant Chinchilla. Through the efforts of the Californian breeders and Dr. DeCastro in the East the Black variety was born. The Broken variety has been a recent addition to the New Zealand breed and was accepted by A.R.B.A. February 2010 by David Mangione. Now broken blacks and broken reds can be shown and compete for Best of Breed and Best Opposite Sex of Breed. Currently there is a C.O.D. out for the development of the Blue variety. The New Zealand breed has been transformed over the course of a near century, and is still being developed to this day. 

New Zealand Colors:

New Zealands are shown in four recognized varieties: Black, Broken, Red, and White.

The Black variety is to uniform jet black coloration throughout. The undercolor is to be dark slate blue with dark brown eye color. 

The Broken variety is the newest and most complex of the four New Zealand varieties. The same emphasis is to be placed on the color of the broken pattern, as well as the marking pattern itself. The Broken variety include any recognized color of the breed in conjunction with white. The colored areas of the broken pattern are to match the standard for the colored variety (black or red). The marking pattern of the broken variety is to have the following pattern: brokens are to have both ears colored, color around the eyes, and on the nose (balanced nose marking ideal), and a body pattern that may be spotted, or blanket. The preference is to have an evenly balanced pattern, whichever the marking pattern may be. The toenails of the animal may be white, colored or any combination of the two, and eye color is to correspond with the eye color specified under the respective solid colored variety. 

The Red variety is to be a brilliant reddish sorrel color, not becoming so dark that it resembles a mahogany red coloration. The color is to be carried as deep down the hair shaft as possible and the belly color is to be similar if not the same shade of red as the top color. White coloration on the underside of the tail or on the front or rear food pads is permissible. Eyes of the New Zealand Red are to be brown in color. 

The White variety is to be pure white, with pink eyes, with faults for any discoloration including dirt and hutch stains.

Judging New Zealands:

New Zelands are judged based on the Schedule of Points featured in the ARBA Standard of Perfection. The New Zealand Schedule of Points is featured below. 

New Zealand Schedule of Points

GENERAL TYPE...........................60
Hindquarters....................20
Midsection.......................18
Shoulders........................17
Head and Ears..................5
Feet & Legs......................0
FUR..............................................15
COLOR.........................................15
CONDITION...................................10

TOTAL POINTS...........................100